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King James IV (1473-1513) was the last Scottish king who spoke Gaelic.

The current Prince Charles provided a Gaelic voice-over on a television version of his story "The Old Man of Lochnagar". That was achieved only after intensive coaching and it would be generous to say that he has any degree of fluency in the language.

King Robert the Bruce was a Gaelic speaker and his parliaments at Ardchattan in the 1320s were held in Gaelic.

The first premier of the Dominion of Canada was Sir John A MacDonald 1815-1891 was a Gaelic speaker. Although he was born in Glasgow, his parents were from Rogart in Sutherland and their language of preference would have been Gaelic.

Given us the British Isles' shortest place name in I (the Gaelic for Iona) and the longest surname in MacGhilleseatheanaich.

The "C" in Mel C. Gibson is Colm Cille. Colm Cille or Calum Cille is how St Columba is known in Gaelic.

King James IV (1473-1513) was the last Scottish king who spoke Gaelic
The first premier of the Dominion of Canada was Sir John A MacDonald 1815-1891
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Whisky Galore

Earliest printed book in Gaelic was 1567. The New Testament in Gaelic was published in 1767. The Old Testament appeared in 1801

Gaelic has provided English with few loan-words. Among the small number are bog, slogan, cairn and dulse. Interestingly, both words in the title of the celebrated film "Whisky Galore" are loan words from Gaelic.

Whisky is a corruption of uisge beatha which translates literally as 'water of life' and galore is from gu leòr which means sufficient, plenty.

Auchenshoogle - a destination of Glasgow buses which rarely fails to raise a smile, is Gaelic in origin. Achadh an t-Seigle means field of rye. Yoker, on the other hand, is from Iochdar, the low part.

There was Gaelic speaking community in North Carolina until late 19th century as a result of a period of settlement by Highlanders and Islanders during the second half of the 18th century. Gaelic sermons were being delivered by Rev J C Sinclair at Fayetteville, North Carolina until 1863.

At least three Canadian Universities have Gaelic mottos.


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